News & Media

The latest from the world of security.

Mandatory Data Breach Notification Scheme in effect

Feb 12, 2018

For quite some time, businesses have been able to self manage their IT problems and most importantly their security breaches, when I say breaches I mean possible hackers who could be trying to get your personal information. On February 22nd those security breaches will no longer be “self managed”, as the Australian Government has finally made it so businesses are legally obliged to report such incidents, there has been many failed attempts to bring this scheme to light, many different Governm...

Bitcoins becoming mainstream and why it’s important to protect them from hackers

Feb 12, 2018

Bitcoins is and most likely will always be the biggest mystery to hit the internet, for those of you who haven’t really heard of bitcoins or have absolutely no idea what I’m actually talking about here is a quick history lesson.

Australian Government reckless with medical data

Feb 12, 2018

Do you feel it’s important to keep some of your medical history or current medical conditions to yourself? Maybe you’re not ready to tell people? Maybe you just want to keep it between you and your medical professional?

Importance Of Encryption In The Workplace

Jul 18, 2017

Encryption, it’s a topic we use often within our blogs, it’s also a topic a lot of people decide not to take seriously, primarily because they struggle to understand how it can affect them personally. This could be caused by several reasons, one they just don’t care and feel they don’t need to be protected, two they struggle to understand what encryption actually is and how it can protect all their personal information and data.

Why Government Mandated Backdoors put us all at Risk

Jun 23, 2017

In a previous blog “CITIZENS NOT SUSPECTS” I emphasised the security vulnerabilities surrounding metadata, and how the government wanted major telecommunication companies, such as Telstra to keep all their metadata so law enforcement could access it on demand. I also mentioned how I felt it couldn’t get any worse; however, I was wrong.

Australian Mobile Security Brief

Jun 02, 2017

As an Australian in 2017, it is only expected that you own some sort of mobile device, and, as a nation, we have now become addicted. Research shows that 64% of Australians don’t go anywhere without their phone in hand, with 73% of those being millennials (18-34 year olds).

Citizens not suspects

May 21, 2017

Many Australians may have little to no knowledge on what metadata is or how it actually affects them. So you’re probably wondering what is metadata? Well, the simplest way to describe metadata is everything you do on a phone or online creates data that is basically a footprint, this data doesn’t show things such as what your text message to your mother or father said nor does it record what you said on the last phone call you had, but instead shows what time you sent the message, the location...

Smartphone Encryption: The Information You Need to Know

Mar 03, 2017

Law-enforcement demand that Apple, Google and app makers decrypt their devices and services, or else provide “back doors” by which they can read data and messages. Technology companies respond that because encrypted data is fundamental to privacy, helping law enforcement would be betraying their clients. Also politicians who have no concept of the issue nevertheless have a lot to say about it.

The need for digital security is increasing

Feb 09, 2017

Recent hacks on US law firms reinforces the need for increased Cyber Security In the wake of a yet another cyber attack on a number of US law firms, the legal industry must respond to protect their practices & their clients confidential information. In 2016, there were a number of major law firm hacks – including the leak of top-secret documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca and the M&A hack attack by a Russian cyber criminal who targeted 48 elite law firms including Hog...

What Australia’s Metadata Laws Mean For You

Jan 20, 2017

Government surveillance is nothing new. In the 16th century, the Elizabethan court kept track of those who wanted to overthrow the Queen with a government agency of spies and code-breakers busily intercepting their correspondence. One Elizabethan method of encryption was done by placing a sheet of paper punched with holes over the top of a letter so that just the letters making up the secret message could be read. The sender and receiver both had to use the same punch-hole ‘key’.